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In this section you can find things that will assist you in your own computer-based musical productions. There's a lot of original Dubroom material which you can use, but also third party material. There's much more than "just" sampled material, as you can find some little pieces of software, presets and other things as well. Everything in this section is, like all stuff in the Dubroom by the way, legal and -a lot of times- absolutely free of charge. Definitely worth a visit, for novice to veteran.

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ABOUT CHAPTER 3

Before you can dub a track, you must have one. The creation of a "raw track" or RIDDIM is where many new DUB artists go wrong. A good riddim starts with a solid reggae drum and bass line, and skanks and a theme on top of that.

This is an archived chapter. It has been re-written in September 2014. CLICK HERE for the current version.

MAKING DUB WITH COMPUTERS - PART 4: BPM SETTINGS

Now that I've elaborated a little bit on the "riddim concept", and provided a link to a great resource site on it, I would like to livicate a few chapters on what I call the "RIDDIM CONCEPT". As I said before, when you have a good riddim, half of the work to get a good DUB is done. I will tell you a bit about the basics of Reggae Music,  and how to program and play it. 

But before you can create a reggae track from scratch, you have to decide at what speed you want to have it in. Ofcourse, you can change it later, as your track progresses and your moods might change, but in order to make a concept and to keep this series of articles a bit logic, I will start with the tempo.

Reggae Music can be very slow, or even very quick, and everything in between. To every rule there is an exception, but basically the speed in BPM of a reggae track  can be anything in between 110 to 190 BPM. Ah, I see a few people raising their eyebrows. Aren't these speeds very fast? Isn't many popular music not over 120 BPM? At speeds above 160 BPM, don't you make Gabber House, or Hardcore Techno? Not at all. 

Reggae is very easy music, even when it's played fast. The way a measure is filled in in reggae, is totaly different then in popular music. Let's take the popular 4/4 format, this is also the format in which reggae music is played. Below you'll see a picture of the popular way to fill in a 4/4 Drum Measure in a sequencer:

Example 0001

   

LISTEN: EXAMPLE0001.MP3 | EXAMPLE0001.MID

If you want to know how the above rhythm sounds at 140 BPM, I have providied a midifile as well as a lofi mp3 file in which you can hear the sound (EXAMPLE 0001). Now that doesn't sound like a reggaebeat, then why di I say reggae is between 110 and 190 BPM?  Because, in reggae, you do only half of what is done in popular music per measure. A correct way of filling in a reggae drum rhythm at 140 BPM is shown in the picture below:

LISTEN: EXAMPLE0002.MP3 | EXAMPLE0002.MID

As you can see, the rhytm is "halved" so to speak. And if you listen (EXAMPLE 0002), you will hear, it also sounds like example 1 is played at half speed. And ofcourse, you can also slow down your sequencer to 70 BPM and you'll have the same beat. The problems arise later on, when you want to fill in your drum rhythm with some more detailed hits. 

<<<PREVIOUS CHAPTER<<< - MAKING DUB WITH COMPUTERS - >>>NEXT CHAPTER>>>

This tutorial is in an unfinished stage, but it does contain the basics to get yourself equipped to use just about any DAW or even hardware studio in order to make DUB from Reggae Music in the authentic and original way. When you have a question or comment you'd like to see addressed, feel free to use the Dubroom Contact pages or join YUKU.com and post your words publicly on the Studio Forum. Click here to read about the latest updates to this tutorial.

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