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WELCOME IN THE STUDIO

In this section you can find things that will assist you in your own computer-based musical productions. There's a lot of original Dubroom material which you can use, but also third party material. There's much more than "just" sampled material, as you can find some little pieces of software, presets and other things as well. Everything in this section is, like all stuff in the Dubroom by the way, legal and -a lot of times- absolutely free of charge. Definitely worth a visit, for novice to veteran.

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ABOUT CHAPTER 2

In part 2 the computer is being presented as a crucial tool, because it can simulate real situations and more, it can therefore also more or less function as a complete studio.  The computer can do more then what it simulates, causing a danger of putting too much technique in the music and therefore it has to be observed that your listeners are not digital so to speak.

This is an archived chapter. It has been re-written in September 2014. CLICK HERE for the current version.

MAKING DUB WITH COMPUTERS - PART 3: INGREDIENTS

I've mentioned the reality, that a computer will not make you a dub track, and that putting a lot of technique in your mix will not make it sound better. In this chapter I would like to elaborate a little on what I perceive as necessary ingredients for a good dub. What do you need to get a "raw" track, that is before you dub it? I would like to answer that in this chapter. And in the next chapters I will give some tips and tricks to make a good foundation. 

It's a bit too simple to simply state that you need a few instruments and apply effects over them. Although a good dub mix can seriously enhance the listening pleasure of an otherwise un-interesting riddim (look to left side on this page for an explanation of the term "riddim"), I think that the riddim itself is half the work.   

I hear many tracks by new artists that label their music "dub", but the riddims of these artists do not contain the necessary ingredients, even though their dubbing techniques might be right. What is the reason so many artist struggle with the vibe of their tracks, even where they sometimes seem to apply genuine Dubbing techniques, the music simply doesn't sound like it? 

Dub is not merely a remixing-technique that can be applied to any kind of music. You'll need a good riddim first. Many artists go wrong in the foundation: a good dub starts with a good riddim. And a good riddim starts with a reggae drum and reggae bassline. This is the most crucial element in every dub. It is the foundation. If you do not have a good bassline and a righteous reggae drum rhythm, you can apply the best techniques over it, but your track will not be interesting. 

I've heard dubs without a bassline, while the drums play a dance or disco beat, and although I would see it as music that is influenced by Dub, I wouldn't call it Dub. 

So make sure, that your drum and bass are right. Make sure, that when you play only the bass and the drum, you start to rock. Make sure, that when you listen to your drum and your bass playing, that you do not feel that it is to empty.  

When you have laid down a good drum and bass foundation, you can build instruments on top of it. I will mention the chords (skank) and the theme. The niceness about reggae music, is that you can use about any instrument to play the chords. Traditionally, chords are played by a combination of Piano, Guitar and Organ. But you can also use other instruments, like synthesizers. There is a whole genre in Dub (UK Dub) where they are using synthesizers for the skank, as I call the playing of chords.  Apart from the drum and bass with accompanying chord plays, I would like to make a short mention of the "theme". A theme is traditionally played by a horn section, but it can also be played by any other (solo) instrument. Mostly, they're short melodies. Some themes even consist of only a few tones! 

You can get more information on the various riddims and even listen to them on the Jamaican Riddim Directory website.

<<<PREVIOUS CHAPTER<<< - MAKING DUB WITH COMPUTERS - >>>NEXT CHAPTER>>>

This tutorial is in an unfinished stage, but it does contain the basics to get yourself equipped to use just about any DAW or even hardware studio in order to make DUB from Reggae Music in the authentic and original way. When you have a question or comment you'd like to see addressed, feel free to use the Dubroom Contact pages or join YUKU.com and post your words publicly on the Studio Forum. Click here to read about the latest updates to this tutorial.

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